Reformed Churchmen

We are Confessional Calvinists and a Prayer Book Church-people. In 2012, we remembered the 350th anniversary of the 1662 Book of Common Prayer; also, we remembered the 450th anniversary of John Jewel's sober, scholarly, and Reformed "An Apology of the Church of England." In 2013, we remembered the publication of the "Heidelberg Catechism" and the influence of Reformed theologians in England, including Heinrich Bullinger's Decades. For 2014: Tyndale's NT translation. For 2015, John Roger, Rowland Taylor and Bishop John Hooper's martyrdom, burned at the stakes. Books of the month. December 2014: Alan Jacob's "Book of Common Prayer" at: January 2015: A.F. Pollard's "Thomas Cranmer and the English Reformation: 1489-1556" at: February 2015: Jaspar Ridley's "Thomas Cranmer" at:

Monday, February 2, 2015

2 February 1901 A.D. Queen Victoria’s Funeral

2 February 1901 A.D.  Queen Victoria’s Funeral

Editors. “Queen Victoria’s Funeral—2 February 1901.” N.d.  Accessed 2 Feb 2015.

Queen Victoria’s funeral took place on this day in British history, 2 February 1901. After 63 years on the throne, Victoria died at the age of 81 at Osborne House on The Isle of Wight. Her military state funeral was held in St. George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle. John Humphrys narrates this video footage of the historic event that marked the end of an era in British history.

The Funeral Cortège passes the London and County Bank in the High Street.

Prior to her death on 22 January 1901 Queen Victoria had written instructions for her funeral, which was to be military as befitting a soldier’s daughter and the head of the army. Though she had worn black since her husband Albert’s death in 1861, she requested that she be dressed in white for her funeral and burial.

On 25 January, Edward VII, the Kaiser and Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught, helped lift her into the coffin. She was dressed in a white dress and her wedding veil. An array of mementos commemorating her extended family, friends and servants were laid in the coffin with her, at her request, by her doctor and dressers. One of Albert’s dressing gowns was placed by her side, with a plaster cast of his hand, while a lock of John Brown’s hair, along with a picture of him, were placed in her left hand concealed from the view of the family by a carefully positioned bunch of flowers. Items of jewellery placed on Victoria included the wedding ring of John Brown’s mother, given to her by Brown in 1883.

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